Ojibwe – The language without loan words


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The Ojibwe language may disappear into extinction if no efforts are made to revive it. This has led to various strategies, which have been put in place to ensure that the language is revitalized. The Rainy River District School Board has been engaged in a reverse engineering project to ensure the continuity of the language. This has been possible through partnerships with various organizations. This includes the SayITFirst company that was started by Mike Parkhill. Together with other people, Parkhill has been able to publish 7 books for children. The books are available in Ojibwe and in English. The main aim of the books is to help children learn their language as well as their cultural traditions.

Ojibwe is renown for the fact that it does not have loan words that have been borrowed from other languages. The language speakers prefer to create new words for any new concepts that community members come across. The new vocabularies that are created vary from one region to another. Speakers may have different names for different objects. Ojibwe is an Algonquian American Indian language. The language has a number of dialects, none of which is considered to be the most prominent one. Ojibwe is also referred to as Ojibwa, Chippewa, Ojibway, or Anishinaabemowin. Ojibwe is mainly spoken in Canada and in the United States. Ojibwe is the most widely spoken Second Nations languge in Canada and the 4th most spoken First Nation languge in the US. Ojibwe is closely related to the Potawatomi language.

The Ojibwe language does not have a standard orthography. The writing system used depends on the geographical location of the speaker. North Canadian speakers write using Northern Algonquian syllabics. The Double Vowel writing system is used by teachers in the US and Canada. Speakers who use this writing system generally adopt English grammar rules when it comes to punctuation and capitalization. This is mainly due to the fact that speakers who use the Double Vowel writing system are literate in English. The Roman orthography has also been used at one point in time.

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